Defining "Science Fiction"
What is science fiction... and why study it?

Perhaps you're here because you're taking one of our courses, working with one of our staff, attending the Campbell Conference, checking out one of our awards or scholarships, or a search led you here. Everyone has some notion of what they consider to be SF, but surveys of the general public reveal sometimes deep misunderstandings. Maybe you have a working definition of SF, or maybe you've heard others endlessly debate SF vs. fantasy or other such Sisyphean endeavors - or maybe you really don't have any idea. At the Center for the Study of Science Fiction, we feel it's important to understand the foundations of SF Studies, and that begins with knowing everyone's talking about the same thing.

So: What is this thing we call "science fiction," and what's its value? This page provides an entree into answering these questions. We'll continue to update and add to this page over time.


I put together this short definition when working with professors from other disciplines:

Science fiction is the literature of of the human species encountering change, whether it arrives via scientific discoveries, technological innovations, natural events, or societal shifts.

Science fiction is the literature of ideas and philosophy, answering such questions as, "What if?" or "If this goes on...," and is thus sometimes more interested with exploring ideas than developing plot or character, if the memes and ideas under examination are powerful enough to sustain the work. It sometimes seeks to subvert the dominant paradigm, when the author sees the status quo as harmful. It is often epistemological - seeking to understand how we know things - ontological, metaphysical, or cosmological. It is concerned with all of us rather than individuals, and with how we got to be what we are, and what we might become.

Science fiction is multi- and interdisciplinary, concerned not only with literary qualities but also exploring core values of diverse fields. To deeply grasp a work, those creating SF and scholars examining it must also possess a strong grasp of the relevant scientific or technological background, as well as the societal, historic, economic, and other implications. It embraces and serves every field of study, and provides a method for creative speculation in non-literary fields.

Science fiction is a community of thinkers and creatives. It is a collaborative effort by people from creative fields; experts in technical, scientific, and humanities fields; professionals in publishing and multimedia forms; plus scholars, critics, and fans - all coming together to better understand and share our individual visions of what it means to be human impacted by ever-accelerating change.

Like the scientific method, science fiction provides an approach to understanding the universe we live in. It provides the tools, tropes, and cognitive framework within which we can explore ideas and safely run thought-experiments where we cannot or ought not in real-world experiments. By dramatizing such scenarios, populating them with believable characters, and providing the background necessary for the audience to willingly suspend disbelief, SF brings ideas to life. In Episode 5 of Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey, Neil deGrasse Tyson said, "Science needs the light of free expression to flourish. It depends on the fearless questioning of authority, and the open exchange of ideas... The nature of scientific genius is to question what the rest of us take for granted, then do the experiment." Replace "science" or "scientific" with "science fiction" in these statements, and you concisely define what SF does - and the value of its study becomes apparent.

In "How America's Leading Science Fiction Authors Are Shaping Your Future" (May 2014 Smithsonian Magazine), Eileen Gunn writes, "Science fiction, at its best, engenders the sort of flexible thinking that not only inspires us, but compels us to consider the myriad potential consequences of our actions. Samuel R. Delany, one of the most wide-ranging and masterful writers in the field, sees it as a countermeasure to the future shock that will become more intense with the passing years. 'The variety of worlds science fiction accustoms us to, through imagination, is training for thinking about the actual changes - sometimes catastrophic, often confusing - that the real world funnels at us year after year. It helps us avoid feeling quite so gob-smacked.'" She quotes MIT professor and engineer Sophia Brueckner, who "laments that researchers whose work deals with emerging technologies are often unfamiliar with science fiction: 'With the development of new biotech and genetic engineering, you see authors like Margaret Atwood writing about dystopian worlds centered on those technologies. Authors have explored these exact topics in incredible depth for decades, and I feel reading their writing can be just as important as reading research papers.'"

This is science fiction.
          - Chris McKitterick

A Collection of SF Definitions

Here's the introduction from the special International Science Fiction issue of World Literature Today:


And here is a longer variant of this article from Libraries Unlimited.


Sometimes infographics are the best way to understand a topic. Here's Ward Shelly's excellent "History of Science Fiction" infographic. By the way, a poster of this is available for purchase!


Click the image to see a much-larger view.


As the world's #1 crowd-sourced encyclopedia, Wikipedia may not be the foremost scholarly authority, but it's a fantastic place to see definitions for something inherently difficult to define. Check out the definitions for science fiction on Wikipedia to get a good idea of how others define SF.

James Gunn is perhaps today's foremost scholar and historian of SF. If you haven't read his books on SF, you owe it to yourself to check them out. You can get a taste of his definition of SF here, where we host several of his essays.


We hope that helps in your pursuit of understanding the field of SF Studies! Check back for updates and additions, and drop us a note if you have suggestions.

Updated 4/28/2014

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