Center for the Study of Science Fiction
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Author David Brin
Presents Talk and Signing at KU

LAWRENCE, KS
For immediate release
Click here for the poster (.pdf) (.jpg)

Facebook event here

"The Dangerous Impudence of Speculative Fiction"

David Brin is a scientist, inventor, and New York Times bestselling author whose novels, including The Postman and Earth, have been translated into 25 languages and won the Campbell, Hugo, Nebula, and other awards. A film directed by Kevin Costner was based on his novel The Postman. Brin's Hugo, Nebula, and Locus Award-winning Uplift Saga (including Startide Rising and The Uplift War) explores genetic engineering of higher animals (including dolphins) to enable inter-species communication. Brin's newest novel from Tor Books, Existence, explores the ultimate question: Billions of planets may be ripe for life, even intelligence. So where is everybody? 

Brin's nonfiction book, The Transparent Society, explores the dangers of secrecy and loss of privacy in our modern world. It won the prestigious Freedom of Speech Award of the American Library Association.

Dr. Brin makes frequent appearances on television shows such as The ArchiTechs, Universe, and Life After People, as well as on PBS, BBC, and NPR. Brin is also a leading commentator on modern and future trends, sharing unique and often humorous insights into the way technology could affect our human future.

With degrees from Caltech and the University of California-San Diego, Dr. Brin serves on advisory panels ranging from astronomy, NASA innovative concepts, nanotech, and SETI, to national defense and technological ethics. Although he explores many fields, Brin has degrees from Caltech and UCSD, including a PhD in Physics (working with Nobelist Hannes Alfven). See this page for a detailed C.V.

Brin's website
Existence book trailer
The Brin Weblog
Brin on Facebook

Abstract for Dr. Brin's Talk

The Dangerous Impudence of Speculative Fiction: For 6000 years, storytelling traditions preached acceptance of hierarchy and notions of a past Golden Age. Reversing this pattern, modern mythmakers often tout diversity, suspicion of authority, and individual eccentricity. Most past societies (and many contemporaries) deemed this trend to be insane. But no artistic genre has promoted rebel memes as forcefully as science fiction. Is this still the case? And is SF appreciated for these values?


A book signing immediately follows Brin's talk.

Everyone is invited!

When
Monday, October 13
4:00pm - 5:30pm
  (Fall Break at KU)

Where
Jayhawk Ink Bookstore
Kansas Union 2nd floor
University of Kansas
1301 Jayhawk Blvd.
Lawrence, KS 66045

Cost
Free

John Symons Presents Talk at KU

LAWRENCE, KS
For immediate release

"What Can We Teach Our Posthuman Descendants?"

John Symons is Chair and Professor of Philosophy at the University of Kansas. He received his PhD from Boston University. He most recently served as an associate professor and chair of the philosophy department at the University of Texas, El Paso. His research interests include metaphysics and epistemology of science (how scientists know what they know), the philosophy of psychology, and the logic behind knowledge and belief. Philosopher Nick Bostrom recently described a "posthuman" as an individual who has gone beyond "the maximum attainable capacities by any current human being without recourse to new technological means." In his lecture, Symons will discuss the posthuman, including what the term might mean and how we can talk to and think about our posthuman descendants. Sponsored by the Hall Center for the Humanities

Everyone is invited!
Official page here. Presented by the KU Hall Center for the Humanities.

When
Tuesday, October 7
7:30pm - 8:30pm

Where
The Commons
Spooner Hall
University of Kansas
1340 Jayhawk Blvd.
Lawrence, KS 66045

Cost
Free

Campbell and Sturgeon Award Winners Announced;
Frederik Pohl Honored

LAWRENCE, KS - June 18, 2014
.pdf version
.doc version

The winners of this year's John W. Campbell Memorial Award for the best science fiction novel, and the Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award for the best short science fiction, have been revealed, announced Christopher McKitterick, Director of the Gunn Center for the Study of Science Fiction. The awards were presented during the Campbell Conference Awards banquet on Friday, June 13, as part of the Campbell Conference held annually at the University of Kansas in Lawrence.

Sarah Pinsker won the Sturgeon Award for her story "In Joy, Knowing the Abyss Behind." Ms. Pinsker was present to accept her award in person, and read "A Stretch of Highway Two Lanes Wide" on Sunday. Second place went to Robert Reed for "Mystic Falls." Vylar Kaftan took third with "The Weight of the Sunrise." The Sturgeon Award was established in 1987 by James Gunn, the Center's Founding Director, and Sturgeon's heirs, including his children and partner Jayne Engelhart Tannehill, as memorial to one of the great short-story writers in a field distinguished by its short fiction. The jury consisted of Elizabeth Bear, Andy Duncan, James Gunn, Kij Johnson, and Nöel Sturgeon, Trustee of the Theodore Sturgeon Literary Estate.

Marcel Theroux won the Campbell Award for his novel Strange Bodies. Mr. Theroux was unable to attend the ceremony but provided a video of his acceptance speech. Second place went to Paul McAuley's Evening's Empires. Linda Nagata took third for The Red: First Light. Writers and critics Harry Harrison and Brian W. Aldiss established the Campbell Award to honor the late editor of Astounding Science Fiction magazine (later named Analog) to continue his efforts to encourage writers to produce their best possible work. Campbell, who edited the magazine from 1937 until his death in 1971, is called by many the father of modern science fiction. The current jury consists of Gregory Benford, Paul Di Filippo, Sheila Finch, James Gunn, Elizabeth Anne Hull, Paul Kincaid, Christopher McKitterick, Pamela Sargent, and T.A. Shippey.

Depending on your reading tastes, your favorite book or short story for the year might turn out to be any of the finalists, so the jurors recommend that you read all the works on both the Sturgeon short-list and the Campbell short-list.

Other weekend events: A reception followed the Awards Banquet at the top of the Kansas Union, with a view six stories above Mount Oread overlooking beautiful downtown Lawrence. Using the theme "Science Fiction and the Real World," this year's Saturday-morning roundtable discussion explored SF's intersection with other disciplines, the future, and the world we live in today. After a mass signing with attending authors and editors, James Gunn, Elizabeth Anne Hull, Kij Johnson, Chris McKitterick, and Mike Page gave readings in honor of Frederik Pohl. Pohl's relationship with the Gunn Center goes back to its earliest roots in the 1970s; he recorded "Ideas in Science Fiction" for the Literature of Science Fiction Lecture Series, spoke at the Intensive Institute on Science Fiction and Science Fiction Writing Workshop, served the Sturgeon Award since 1995, and shared his wisdom and expertise for decades. On Saturday evening, attendees were treated to a special showing of CSA: The Confederate States of America, followed by a discussion with writer and director Kevin Willmott and cinematographer Matthew Jacobson. Sunday morning began with a Q&A with our special guests, during which Ms. Pinsker gave a reading, followed by an informal "Science Fiction Sunday" event at a local home.

Congratulations to the honorees! Much appreciation to all who participated, and thanks to the winners for providing us with such fine reading - Ad Astra!

John W. Campbell Memorial Award
Finalists Announced

LAWRENCE, KS - May 18, 2014
for immediate release
Also available in .doc or .pdf version

This year's finalists for the John W. Campbell Memorial Award for best science-fiction novel have been selected, announced Christopher McKitterick, Director of the Gunn Center for the Study of Science Fiction. The awards will be presented on Friday, June 13, as part of the Campbell Conference held annually at the University of Kansas in Lawrence.

The Center is pleased to announce the finalists for the 2014 John W. Campbell Memorial Award for best SF novel of 2013:

Max Barry Lexicon Penguin
Stephen Baxter Proxima Gollancz
Dave Eggers The Circle Knopf
Karen Joy Fowler We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves Marian Wood / Putnam
Nicola Griffith Hild Farrar, Straus, and Giroux
Wolfgang Jeschke The Cusanus Game Tor (1st English edition)
Ann Leckie Ancillary Justice Orbit
Phillip Mann The Disestablishment of Paradise Gollancz
Paul McAuley Evening's Empires Gollancz
Linda Nagata The Red: First Light Mythic Island Press
Christopher Priest The Adjacent Gollancz
Alastair Reynolds On the Steel Breeze Gollancz
Kim Stanley Robinson Shaman Orbit
Charles Stross Neptune's Brood Ace
Marcel Theroux Strange Bodies Faber & Faber / Farrar, Straus, and Giroux

The Campbell Award was created to honor the late editor of Astounding Science Fiction magazine, now Analog. Campbell, who edited the magazine from 1937 until his death in 1971, is called by many the father of modern SF. Writers and critics Harry Harrison and Brian W. Aldiss established the award in Campbell's name as a way of continuing his efforts to encourage writers to produce their best possible work, and presented the first Award in 1973.

The Award is selected by a committee small enough to discuss among its members all of the nominated novels. The current jury consists of Gregory Benford, Paul Di Filippo, Sheila Finch, James Gunn, Elizabeth Anne Hull, Paul Kincaid, Christopher McKitterick, Pamela Sargent, and T.A. Shippey. In 2009, Paul A. Carter retired from the jury after serving for many years, and Paul Di Filippo and Sheila Finch joined the committee. In 2008, Paul Kincaid replaced Farah Mendlesohn.

The Award will be presented Friday, June 13, at the Campbell Conference, held at the University of Kansas in Lawrence, June 13-15. The Campbell Conference has been held here each year since 1978. It includes a Friday-evening banquet where the annual Campbell and Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Awards are presented; a Saturday-morning roundtable discussion with scholars, scientists, and writers of science fiction; an afternoon discussion about interdisciplinary science-fiction studies, and other events. This year's topic is "Science Fiction and the Real World," with a special focus on the work and life of Frederik Pohl, a long-time friend of the Center.

Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award
Finalists Announced

LAWRENCE, KS - May 5, 2014
for immediate release
Also available in .doc or .pdf version

This year's finalists for the Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award for best short science fiction have been selected, announced Christopher McKitterick, Director of the Gunn Center for the Study of Science Fiction. The awards will be presented during the Campbell Conference on Friday, June 13, as part of the Campbell Conference held annually at the University of Kansas in Lawrence.

The Center is pleased to announce the finalists for the 2014 Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award for best short SF of 2013:

"Bloom," Gregory Norman Bossert. Asimov's, Dec 2013.
"The Weight of the Sunrise," Vylar Kaftan. Asimov's, Feb 2013.
"They Shall Salt the Earth with Seeds of Glass," Alaya Dawn Johnson. Asimov's, Jan 2013.
"Over There," Will McIntosh. Asimov's, Jan 2013.
"The Wildfires of Antarctica," Alan DeNiro. Tyrannia and Other Renditions, Small Beer Press (originally appeared in Oct/Nov Asimov's).
"The Irish Astronaut," Val Nolan. Electric Velocipede, May 2013.
"In Joy, Knowing the Abyss Behind," Sarah Pinsker. Strange Horizons, July 2013.
"Mystic Falls," Robert Reed. Clarkesworld, Nov 2013.
"Selected Program Notes from the Retrospective Exhibition of Theresa Rosenberg Latimer," Kenneth Schneyer. Clockwork Phoenix 4, Mythic Delirium Books.
"The Urashima Effect," E. Lily Yu. Clarkesworld, June 2013.

Sturgeon, born in 1918, was closely identified with the Golden Age of science fiction, 1939-1950, and is often mentioned alongside Isaac Asimov, Robert A. Heinlein, and A. E. van Vogt as one of the four writers who established and led the way through that time. All four published their first SF stories in 1939, usually identified as the start of the Golden Age, and Sturgeon was famous for providing the heart.

In addition to fiction (his best-known novel is the classic, More Than Human), Sturgeon also wrote book reviews, poetry, screenplays, radio plays, and television plays, including two classic teleplays for the original Star Trek. He was a popular lecturer and teacher, and was a regular visiting author during the Intensive English Institute on the Teaching of Science Fiction. Sturgeon died in 1985. His books, manuscripts, and papers are deposited at the University of Kansas.

The Award will be presented Friday, June 13, at the Campbell Conference, held at the University of Kansas in Lawrence, Kansas, June 13-15. The Campbell Conference has been held here each year since 1978. It includes a Friday-evening banquet where the annual Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award and the John W. Campbell Memorial Award are given; a Saturday-morning roundtable discussion with scholars, scientists, and writers of science fiction; an afternoon discussion about interdisciplinary science-fiction studies, and other events. This year's topic is "Science Fiction in the Real World," with a special focus on the work and life of Frederik Pohl, a long-time friend of the Center.

Author and NASA Physicist Les Johnson
Presents KU Colloquium on Advanced Space Propulsion

LAWRENCE, KS - March 22, 2014

Les Johnson at the US Space and Rocket Center

Coming Friday, March 28: Les Johnson is gives a colloquium for the Aerospace Engineering Department about advanced space propulsion, particularly solar sails.

Les Johnson is a husband, father, physicist, manager, and author of science fiction and science fact. Baen has published two of his science-fiction books (Back to the Moon and Going Interstellar), with two more coming soon (Rescue Mode with Ben Bova, and Destruction From Near Earth). In addition, Springer Press has published four of Johnson's popular-science books. In his "day job," Johnson serves as Deputy Manager for the Advanced Concepts Office at the NASA George C. Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

Find Les' blog here.

When
March 28
4:00pm - 5:00pm

Where
Spahr Engineering Classroom
Eaton Hall
University of Kansas
Lawrence, KS

Cost
Free

Scholar Gary K. Wolfe
Presents KU Bold Aspirations Lecture

LAWRENCE, KS - February 22, 2014
Click here for the poster (.pdf)

Click here for the .jpg of the poster
Facebook event here

"Asking the Next Question: Science Fiction and the Rational Imagination"

Gary K. Wolfe presents KU's newest Bold Aspirations talk. Wolfe has been a contributing editor and reviewer for Locus magazine since 1991. He is a Professor of Humanities at Roosevelt University in Chicago, where he has also served as Dean of University College and Dean of Graduate Studies.

Wolfe's recent work includes Evaporating Genres: Essays on Fantastic Literature and Sightings: Reviews 2002-2006. His earlier studies include The Known and the Unknown: The Iconography of Science Fiction (won the Eaton Award); David Lindsay; Critical Terms for Science Fiction and Fantasy; Harlan Ellison: The Edge of Forever (with Ellen R. Weil); Soundings: Reviews 1992-1996 (won the British Science Fiction Award, Hugo nominee); Bearings: Reviews 1997-2001 (Hugo nominee). Wolfe received the Science Fiction Research Association's Pilgrim Award, International Association for the Fantastic in the Arts' Distinguished Scholarship Award, and the World Fantasy Award for criticism and reviews.

He edited Up the Bright River (2011), the first posthumous collection of Philip José Farmer stories; and American Science Fiction: Nine Classic Novels of the 1950s (Library of America, 2012); he co-edited with Jonathan Strahan The Best of Joe Haldeman (Subterranean Press, 2013). Wolfe serves on the editorial boards of Science Fiction Studies and The Journal of the Fantastic in the Arts, and has served as manuscript reviewer for Oxford, Indiana, Illinois, and Wesleyan University Presses.

Since 2010, Wolfe and Australian editor Jonathan Strahan have also hosted the weekly Coode Street Podcast on science fiction, which has been nominated for four different awards in 2011 and the Hugo Awards in 2012 and 2013.

The title of Wolfe's talk borrows from Theodore Sturgeon's motto, "Ask the next question," which he referred to when signing his name with a Q and an arrow running through it, and described as: "...the symbol of everything humanity has ever created, and is the reason it has been created" (more on that here).

Abstract for Wolfe's Talk

While recent studies in cognitive science suggest that imaginative thought follows principles very similar to that of rational decision-making, science fiction literature has been demonstrating much the same thing for nearly two centuries. But science fiction as a mode of rational imagination has suffered from its reputation as pulp literature, from its somewhat degraded representations in film and media, and even from its own advocates. Using writer Theodore Sturgeon's dictum of "ask the next question," this presentation represents an effort to begin to outline both the narrative spaces encompassed by science fiction, represented by two widely disparate stories, and to suggest the importance of "science fictional thinking" as a mode of rational imagination.


A reception in the Spooner Hall Commons immediately follows Wolfe's talk, from 5:00pm - 6:00pm. Wolfe is a dynamic and fascinating speaker - don't miss this event!

When
Monday, March 10
4:00-5:00pm

Where
Spooner Hall Commons
University of Kansas
Lawrence, KS

Cost
Free

KU Libraries Acquire
William S. Burroughs Collection

LAWRENCE, KS - February 6, 2014
Official KU press release here

The University of Kansas Libraries has acquired the last works of legendary author William S. Burroughs. James Grauerholz, executor of Burroughs' estate, Lawrence resident and KU alumnus, has donated the author's final personal journals, type scripts, and editing materials to the Kenneth Spencer Research Library. The materials were the source for Last Words: The Final Journals of William S. Burroughs, published in 2000, which Grauerholz edited. Grauerholz had multiple reasons for donating the journals to KU.

"William spent his last years, wrote his last books, painted his (first and) last paintings and jotted-down his last words in Lawrence, Kansas," Grauerholz said. "So the city of Lawrence, and the University of Kansas, which is the heart of our community, deserve to have the last word on Burroughs' life and works."

Burroughs, the often-controversial author, is perhaps best known as the author of Naked Lunch and numerous other novels, including Junkie, Nova Express, the Cut-Up Trilogy, and Cities of The Red Night. His work was highly influential on both American and international literature, and he was once described by Norman Mailer as "the only American novelist living today who may conceivably be possessed by genius." His work and influence were recognized professionally as well. He was inducted into the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters and received numerous other professional honors.

Burroughs lived in Lawrence from 1982 until his death in 1997. While they were his final years, they were far from retirement. In fact, they were among his most productive, in which he wrote his final seven major books, created hundreds of artworks and worked on several multimedia projects, including The Black Rider, an avant-garde opera with Tom Waits and Robert Wilson, plus audio and music recordings with U2, REM, Laurie Anderson, and others; as well as film projects with directors such as Gus Van Sant and Howard Brookner.

The donation of materials marking the end of Burroughs' life coincides with the centenary of his birth, February 5, 1914. He was associated with many cities around the world, including New York, Mexico City, Paris, London, and Tangier, Morocco. But the fact that his Lawrence years were among his most creative and important led Grauerholz to donate the 10 journals, type script, and editing materials to KU Libraries. Several of the journals will be on display in the library throughout February.

"This is long overdue for the Burroughs estate to work with the Kenneth Spencer Research Library," said Grauerholz, who attended KU from 1969 to 1973 and taught American studies in the 2000s. "I'm grateful the University will be able to make these materials available to the community of scholars, here and worldwide. Now anyone with a good reason to read them will be able to."

The donations will add the libraries' already noteworthy holdings of Burroughs materials. Among the materials are contributions to periodicals and first editions of many of his works, including Naked Lunch, and a manuscript collection containing materials from the 1950s and '60s, including letters by Burroughs as well as letters written to him by Allen Ginsberg, Gregory Corso, publishers, and others. There are also several short typescripts and "cut-ups" by Burroughs, written for Jeff Nuttall's My Own Mag and others by writer and artist Claude Pelieu. The collections also include audio recordings of Burroughs made in the early 1960s purchased from Melville Hardiment at that time, including Burroughs speaking on "A Day in the Life of a Junkie."

The materials will be cataloged and made available upon request to inquirers who wish to read or study them. Elspeth Healey, special collections librarian, said the donation will be of great scholastic and cultural value for a broad population.

"Research in the humanities depends on access to writers' papers and other primary sources. Burroughs' last journals will open up new avenues of scholarship for this significant cultural figure and shine a light on the Lawrence chapter of his life and creative output," Healey said. "We are pleased that the University of Kansas will be able to make these unique artifacts available to students, scholars and the public."

News items:
Utne Reader
Washington Times
Kansas City Star
Lawrence Journal-World
Topeka Capital-Journal
Channel 6 Lawrence
Kansas Public Radio
Wichita Eagle

Hugo Award-Winning Author Harry Turtledove
Presents at McPherson College

McPHERSON, KS - January 2, 2014
Click here for full press release

"What if? What Alternate History Fiction Tells Us About Our Past, Present, and Future"

Hugo Award-winning writer Harry Turtledove - broadly christened as the "Master of Alternate History" - presents about his work and the alternate-history genre at McPherson College on January 16.

The special McPherson College Lecture is entitled "What if? What Alternate History Fiction Tells Us About Our Past, Present, and Future."  The public is invited and encouraged to attend this free lecture.

For more information, call the Union Programs office at (785) 864-7469.

When
January 16, 2014, 7:00pm

Where
Miller Library: 1600 E. Euclid
West side of the McPherson, KS, College campus

Cost
Free

Planet Comicon 2014
Special Guests: Star Trek Cast Members, Many More

KANSAS CITY, MO - January 6, 2014
Click here for full press release

Planet Comicon is pleased to announce a massive Star Trek: The Next Generation event. Kansas City welcomes Marina Sirtis, Gates McFadden, Michael Dorn, Jonathan Frakes, LeVar Burton, Brent Spiner, and Wil Wheaton for the weekend, plus William Shatner will be available on a limited schedule for photos and autographs on Sunday only.

William Shatner Jonathan Frakes LeVar Burton Brent Spiner Gates McFadden Michael Dorn Marina Sirtis

The con will also host many other comic and media personalities for the weekend. Advance tickets to Planet Comicon 2014 are available online now.

Fulbright Scholar and Pulitzer-Prize Winner
Michael Dirda Speaks at KU

LAWRENCE, KS - October 9, 2013
Press release: .docx or .pdf
Poster: .pdf

Michael Dirda presents this Fall's Richard W. Gunn Memorial Lecture:

"A Literary Life:
Twenty-Five Years at the Washington Post Book World"

When
Tuesday, October 29, 2013
5:00pm - 6:30pm

Where
Big 12 Room
University of Kansas Student Union
Lawrence, KS 66045

Cost
Free! Seating is limited, so arrive early to ensure a spot.

Jayhawk Ink bookstore will have copies of several of Dirda's books available to purchase in the room (as well as in the bookstore on Level2) and have signed by the author after his talk.



Click the image to download
the full-size .pdf poster.

About Dirda
In 1978 Michael Dirda joined the staff of The Washington Post as an assistant editor in its book review section. In those days, The Post still used typewriters, six-ply paper and linotype machines, and was riding high in the wake of Watergate. In this Fall's Gunn Lecture, Dirda - a Fulbright Scholar and Pulitzer-Prize-winning critic - speaks about literary journalism then and now, life at a great newspaper, some of the writers he has come to know, and the ongoing evolution of books and publishing.

Dirda, a weekly columnist for The Washington Post, is the author of the memoir An Open Book and of four collections of essays: Readings, Bound to Please, Book by Book and Classics for Pleasure. His latest book, On Conan Doyle, received the 2012 Edgar Allan Poe Award for nonfiction from the Mystery Writers of America. A Fulbright Fellowship recipient, Dirda graduated with Highest Honors in English from Oberlin College, and earned a PhD in comparative literature (medieval studies and European romanticism) from Cornell University. In 1993 he won the Pulitzer Prize for his literary criticism.

Dirda's review column for The Washington Post was one of the very first that seriously covered science fiction and other genres not typically treated with the same respect as mainstream literature. Check out his Science Fiction Reading List as documented by a fan.

The Lecture Series
The Gunn Lecture, endowed by Dr. Richard W. Gunn, James Gunn's brother, has featured several science-fiction scholars. Although it has also sponsored speakers on Shakespeare and Ralph Ellison, it often brings distinguished science-fiction scholars to the campus beginning with scholar Fredric Jameson, William A. Lane Professor at Duke University; and continuing with Bill Brown, Edgar Carson Waller Professor at the University of Chicago; China Miéville, British author of what has become known as the New Weird; Nöel Sturgeon, Theodore Sturgeon's daughter, Trustee of his literary estate (which recently made a major donation of his papers to KU), Dean of Environmental Studies at York University in Toronto, and juror on the Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award; and most recently science-fiction author, activist, journalist, and technology activist Cory Doctorow. The Center also recently co-sponsored a visit from Michael Chabon, prize-winning author and editor.

Max Brooks of World War Z Visits KU

In the spirit of "Zombie Week," the University of Kansas SUA is bringing Max Brooks, the author of World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War is giving a talk at KU. World War Z is a post-apocalyptic novel about humankind's struggle with a zombie virus. The novel was made into a movie starring Brad Pitt, released this summer.

The event is free for students and the general public thanks to the Lawrence Public Library.

For more information call the Union Programs office at (785) 864-7469.

When
October 23, 2013, 7:00pm - 9:00pm

Where
Ballroom, KU Kansas Union

Cost
Free

James Gunn Reading and Signing in Lawrence, KS: October 9

LAWRENCE, KS - September 19, 2013

James Gunn will read from and sign his new novel Transcendental on Wednesday, Oct. 9, in the Jayhawk Ink Bookstore from 4:00pm-5:30pm. Transcendental is an alien Canterbury Tales-Origin of Species-New Space Opera mashup, full of ideas and wonder.

Come get a copy of his wonderful new novel that Frederik Pohl called, "his best yet, and in it he demonstrates his possession of one of the most finely developed skills at world-building (and at aliens-creating to populate those worlds) in science fiction today. Read it!"


James Gunn's newest novel, out now
from Tor Books. Click for full-size slipcover art (.pdf).


James Gunn, photographed in 2013 by Jason Dailey.

James Gunn on Science Fiction Spotlight Radio Show: September 27

LAWRENCE, KS - September 29, 2013

James Gunn will appear on "Authors on the Air" on Friday, Sept. 27, at 11:00am. The show's description:

"Dive in to the history, the art, the teaching and the lessons of the future!"

"Authors On The Air is proud to present the Science Fiction Spotlight, with Mack Meijers, welcoming to the studio the author, editor, anthologist, scholar and grand master of science fiction - James Gunn. Born in the interbellum, James Gunn is a man more than an author of science fiction. A navy veteran, he has a rich career in writing, and teaching, in science - and science fiction. Winner of the Hugo Award, 24th Grand Master of the SFWA, and Founding Director of the Center for the Study of Science Fiction."

"Tune in, listen in, call or Skype in for great conversation, an in-depth interview, sneak peeks - a good dose of the how-to and the history of the future and much, much more! The Science Fiction Spotlight - featuring straight-up and in-depth sessions of interviews and conversations, with the masters of the genre, upcoming talents - published and self-published - and industry professionals."

In Memoriam: Frederik Pohl
1919 - 2013

LAWRENCE, KS - September 2, 2013

Frederik Pohl authored nearly 50 novels, dozens of short stories, and several nonfiction books, and has edited a number of anthologies and magazines, perhaps most notably Galaxy. Pohl won the Hugo and Nebula Awards multiple times, as well as the Campbell Award (and until recently, he was the only two-time Campbell winner, 1978 and 1985). Here's a short biography on his website.

At the 2013 Campbell Conference, the Center presented a special Sturgeon Award to Fred for his long and distinguished service to the Award and the Center.

Starting in 1995, when the Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award became a juried award, Pohl served first with James Gunn and Judith Merril, and since then with several other distinguished jurors until retiring in 2013. Pohl was associated with Gunn since the 1940s, eventually becoming involved with what later became the Center for the Study of Science Fiction. Here he presented many talks, recorded a discussion about "The Ideas in Science Fiction" in 1973 Literature of Science Fiction lecture series, served the Intensive Institute on Science Fiction and Science Fiction Writing Workshop, and lent his understanding to the Center in countless other ways. We cannot begin to express how much we will miss his help, insight, and friendship.

Right up until his death, Pohl continued expanding the time-scope of The Way the Future Was: A Memoir, published serially along with other thoughts a blog at The Way the Future Blogs, which earned him a Hugo Award - for fan writing! The book and his recent additions are a moving, insightful, and revelatory look at the cultural history of SF.

Sturgeon Award juror Andy Duncan talks about being honored with the Award by Pohl:

One of the highlights of my life was being handed my Sturgeon Award trophy by Frederik Pohl, at the 2002 ceremony, as he's been one of my heroes since I was a kid. His stories, novels, and nonfiction, and the magazines and anthologies he has edited, have not only shaped the field of science fiction for me and everyone else, but have shaped my conception of what it means to be a professional writer. On the Sturgeon jury, in particular, his firsthand knowledge of the science-fiction short story is simply irreplaceable; the jury will have a Fred-shaped hole in it forever.


Pohl presents the Sturgeon Award to Duncan.

CSSF Associate Director Kij Johnson discusses her relationship with Fred:

I met Fred Pohl in the summer of 1994, when I received the Sturgeon Award at the Campbell Conference. My vividest memory of the event was him shaking my hand and telling me I had written a fine story. I still feel proud and warm every time I remember this. A couple of years later, I became part of the Sturgeon jury with him, and I relished his part in discussion of the finalists and his company at each year's Campbell Conference. He was a brilliant writer, a great editor, a good agent, an intelligent critic, a charming speaker, a humorous conversationalist - and a great fan. I will miss him, as so many will.

CSSF Director Chris McKitterick recalls how Pohl changed his life:

I'll miss Fred a great deal. I first came to the University of Kansas to take James Gunn's SF Writing Workshop in the summer of 1992, and was both astounded and incredibly pleased to discover that we had the opportunity to work with not only Gunn but another master of the art - completely to ourselves! - Frederik Pohl. I first read his work in the form of Gateway, which still holds a central place in my heart.

Fred hugely influenced my writing development - not just by example through his brilliant writing, but also through his insightful and inciseful critiques of my stories. In just a few words, Fred could pin down what was wrong with a story and suggest just what it needed to work. One of the most-memorable comments I ever received was Fred's, "If I were still editing Galaxy, I'd buy it." That was all he said about the story, and with that benediction, he made me feel like a real writer. One of my novellas owes its title to Fred; I can't recall what awful moniker it first bore, but when Fred Pohl said, "Your title isn't very memorable; I'd call it 'The Recursive Man,'" I knew immediately he was right and that I was in the midst of a genius wordsmith.

That workshop changed my life. I felt that I must do my absolute best to become a real SF writer so I could retroactively deserve such access and professional attention. Fred returned to the Workshop and Campbell Conference just about every year for the following two decades, sharing his time, intelligence, and gentle wisdom with other summer-program attendees. Fred is one of the reasons I fell in love with the Center. No one can be Fred, but he inspires us to be our absolute best.

CSSF Founding Director James Gunn remembers Fred:

Since I learned of Fred's death I've remembered that he was associated with almost everything good in science fiction that happened to me. I first met Fred 61 years ago, and he sold my stories, bought my stories, edited my books, shared precious moments at meetings here and abroad, answered my calls to help my fledgling science-fiction programs, and was always there for encouragement and advice. Having his words on the cover of my current novel and in the commemorative program of LoneStarCon 3 is like a final blessing that I will always cherish.

Gunn also shares an excerpt of his essay, "Fred and Me," from the Gateways collection, edited by Pohl's wife, Elizabeth Anne Hull

Pohl at the 2002 Campbell Conference.

Fred told me once, "Conventions never end; they just adjourn to another venue." That's the way it was for Fred and me. We met at a convention, the World Science Fiction Convention of 1952, held in the old Morrison Hotel in Chicago. It was my first convention, my first meeting with SF writers and editors, and even readers, of any kind, and it was a wonderful beginning.

I'd been writing science fiction since the spring of 1948 and having my stories published since the fall of 1949. During those two years I kept writing, among other things a novella, "Breaking Point," that I adapted from a three-act play I wrote as an Investigation and Conference project. I sent it to Horace Gold, editor of Galaxy, and one day I got a telephone call from this clipped New York voice saying he liked "Breaking Point," but it was too long and would I let Ted Sturgeon cut it down.

Horace also suggested my name to Fred Pohl, who was running a literary agency called Dirk Wylie and, I later discovered, was close to Horace, and Fred became my agent. He was a good agent, and he sold a lot of stories for me—some to Horace (though not "Breaking Point," which he sold to Lester del Rey at the new Space Science Fiction), some to John Campbell, some to lesser markets, and one wondrous sale to Argosy—and a couple of novels.

When Orson Scott Card got too busy to organize the Sturgeon Award decision process, I asked Fred if we could do it. Together we recruited Judy Merril and later, after her resignation the year before her death, we got Kij Johnson, a previous winner, as a replacement. I haven't even mentioned Fred's distinguished service as president of the Science Fiction Writers of America (or the irony of his having criticized its value in earlier days), or as president of World SF, or his many invitations to speak as a futurist, or his lecturing on science fiction in Europe for the US Information Agency (he paved the way for my three later trips), or his Grand Master Award from SFWA, or his awards from other groups such as the Science Fiction Research Association, or the trends his stories and novels have anticipated. You can look it up.

We've all grown old together, Fred and me and science fiction, too. Conventions are not what they used to be (neither is the future). I wasn't there at the beginning of the conventions, as Fred was, or of the Futurians, who were banned from the first World Convention but got their revenge by taking over a good part of science fiction in their day. But we've seen a lot of it—Fred for more than seventy years, me for only sixty. Maybe the next convention will convene in an alternate universe.

CheckCheck out this recording of Fred reading his brilliant story, "Day Million" - Part I:

And Part II:

Want to hear more from Fred? On November 10, 2012, Fred made a rare, live appearance at Windycon 39 in Lombard, Illinois, talking about his 75-year writing career. Leigh Hanlon of ChicagoScope recorded this piece which also features Pohl's wife, Elizabeth Anne Hull, and author and journalist Leah A. Zeldes, who interviews Pohl:

Click to play the ChicagoScope podcast,
"75 years of Fred."
Click here for direct MP3 download.

He was a truly great man, and kind, and thoughtful, and patient, and good. He never stopped pursuing his passions, which among many things included continuing to educate himself, writing, and even traveling well into his 90s. His endless promotion of science was inspiring, and his gentle criticism of the foolish ways of humans made me a better person. I'll miss him a great deal. We all will. The loss of Frederik Pohl makes the world a little less bright.

Our hearts go out to Betty, who was wonderful for him, and good to him, and helped keep Fred lively and active even when life became challenging.

 

CSSF Director Chris McKitterick to Present Talk on
Science Fiction at the "Science on Tap" Series

LAWRENCE, KS - July 19, 2013

The University of Kansas Natural History Museum hosts a science discussion and lecture series of informal "science café" events called "Science on Tap" presented at a local brewery. For this summer's event, Chris McKitterick leads a conversation on "Science Fiction: Mythologies for a Changing Age" from 7:30pm - 9:00pm on Tuesday, July 23, at Free State Brewing Company, 636 Massachusetts St., in Lawrence, KS.

Description: Speculative fiction has served as the mythology of our time from the very first stories humans told one another to today's most relevant literature. These stories provide concrete, emotionally and intellectually satisfying paths toward making sense of living in a world of ever-increasing change. For this Science on Tap, Chris McKitterick, Director of the Gunn Center for the Study of Science Fiction, leads a discussion about the ways that science fiction provides our myths and teaches us how to survive and remain sane in an age of change.

CSSF Founding Director James Gunn to be
Author Guest of Honor at 2013 WorldCon

LAWRENCE, KS - July 12, 2013

James Gunn will be Author Guest of Honor at the 2013 WorldCon in San Antonio, Texas, called LoneStarCon3. Former students and friends are invited to attend a special reception honoring Gunn during the convention; if you'll be at LoneStarCon and you're a "Young Gunn" or a friend of Jim interested in attending, please contact Chris McKitterick (cmckit@ku.edu) ASP to be placed on the invite-only attendee list.

Today is also Gunn's 90th birthday - happy birthday, Jim!

Gunn's upcoming (August 2013) novel Transcendental just got a starred review from Kirkus Reviews that calls it "Gunns best in years - quite possibly his best ever." What a nice birthday present, wouldn't you say? Beyond being honored at this year's WorldCon, he just had a collection of essays published, was Guest of Honor at the 2013 SFRA/Eaton Conference, and will see at least two more books published before his next birthday. If only the rest of us could be so awesome at any age.

Campbell, Sturgeon, and Lifeboat Winners Announced;
Frederik Pohl Honored for Sturgeon Award Service

LAWRENCE, KS - June 17, 2013
.pdf version here
.doc version here

The winners of this year's John W. Campbell Memorial Award for the best science fiction novel, Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award for the best short science fiction, and Lifeboat to the Stars Award have been revealed, announced Christopher McKitterick, Director of the Gunn Center for the Study of Science Fiction. The awards were presented during the Campbell Conference Awards banquet on Friday, June 14, as part of the Campbell Conference held annually at the University of Kansas in Lawrence.

The first-ever Lifeboat to the Stars Award went to Tau Ceti, a unique combination of novella by Kevin J. Anderson and sequel novelette by Steven Savile; Anderson was on hand to accept the award. The Lifeboat Foundation established this new award to recognize the best work of science fiction published in 2011 or 2012 that contributes to an understanding of the benefits, means, or difficulties of interstellar travel, in the hope that it will assist with the Foundation's goal to improve humankind's long-term survival. Eric Klien, President and administrator of the Foundation, said, "science fiction has the ability to explore the unknown and its human implications. We want to encourage writers to contribute their imaginations to these vital purposes."

Molly Gloss won the Sturgeon Award for her short story "The Grinnell Method," from the September, 2012, issue of Strange Horizons. Though she was unable to attend, Gloss provided a video of her acceptance speech. Linda Nagata won second place for "Nahiku West," published in the October issue of Analog. Robert Reed took third place with Eater-of-Bone, a stand-alone novella by PS Publishing. The jurors note that the voting for this year's prize was especially close, and that all of the top three stories deserve recognition. The Sturgeon Award was established in 1987 by James Gunn, Founding Director of the Center for the Study of Science Fiction at KU, and the heirs of Theodore Sturgeon, including his partner Jayne Engelhart Tannehill and Sturgeon's children, as an appropriate memorial to one of the great short-story writers in a field distinguished by its short fiction.

Adam Roberts won the Campbell Award for Jack Glass: The Story of a Murderer; due to other obligations, Roberts was unable to attend, but sent his video acceptance. Terry Bisson's Any Day Now, published by Overlook, won second place. Third place was a tie between M. John Harrison's Empty Space, published by Gollancz and Night Shade Books; and G. Willow Wilson's debut novel, Alif the Unseen, published by Grove Press. As with this year's Sturgeon Award, the Campbell Award voting was extremely close, which is why the jury wished to recognize four books this year instead of the usual three. Writers and critics Harry Harrison and Brian W. Aldiss established the Campbell Award to honor the late editor of Astounding Science Fiction magazine (which later became Analog) as a way of continuing his efforts to encourage writers to produce their best possible work. Campbell, who edited the magazine from 1937 until his death in 1971, is called by many writers and scholars the father of modern science fiction. 

Depending on your reading tastes, your favorite book or short story for 2012 might turn out to be any of the finalists, so the jurors recommend that you read all the works on both the Sturgeon short-list and the Campbell short-list.

Additionally, James Gunn presented a special Sturgeon Award to Frederik Pohl for his long and distinguished service to the Award and the Center. Starting in 1995, when the Sturgeon Award became a juried award, Pohl served first with James Gunn and Judith Merril, and since then with several other highly respected jurors. Pohl also presented many talks, recorded a fantastic discussion about "Ideas in Science Fiction" for the Literature of Science Fiction Lecture Series, served the Intensive Institute on Science Fiction and Science Fiction Writing Workshop, and lent his understanding to the Center in countless other ways. We very much appreciate his insight and friendship, and will miss him.

Using the theme "To the Stars" ("Ad Astra Per Aspera" is the Kansas state motto), this year's Saturday morning round-table discussion explored SF's long relationship with off-planet travel, its promises, and the future of the human race as a galactic species. We also discussed the important steps along the path to the stars, and of course science fiction and its role in these themes. On Saturday afternoon, Kevin J. Anderson, Andy Duncan, and James Gunn read from new works, and the second issue of James Gunn's Ad Astra journal was released. Attending special guests included authors Andy Duncan, James Gunn, and Kij Johnson; editor Eric T. Reynolds; film-maker Kevin Willmott and cinematographer Matthew Jacobson, who hosted a special screening of their upcoming film, Destination: Planet Negro!; plus many others.

Congratulations to all the honorees! Many thanks to all who attended, and thanks to the winners for providing us all with such fine reading - Ad Astra!

Campbell Conference Updates

LAWRENCE, KS - June 10, 2013

Due to a family emergency, Robert J. Sawyer is unable to attend this year's Campbell Conference. Visit the Conference page to see our special guests for 2013.

Best-selling SF author Kevin J. Anderson kicks off the Conference on Friday afternoon with a talk about dreaming big and making unrealistic expectations pay off.

From 9:00am - 4:45pm, the Spencer Research Library will display a selection of rare SF materials from the special SF collections in the Johnson room. Stop by any time, and ask for Elspeth Healey if you would like a tour. This, of course, is open to the public whether or not you've registered for the Conference.

On Friday evening, the Awards Ceremony and Banquet honors the winners of the John W. Campbell Memorial Award, Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award, and "Lifeboat to the Stars" Award, followed by a reception in the Oread Hotel.

Saturday morning's round-table discussion theme is "To the Stars," where we will explore SF's long relationship with off-planet travel, its promises, and the future of the human race as a galactic species. We will also discuss the important steps along the path to the stars.

During lunch break on Saturday, get your books signed by this year's guest authors and editors at a mass autographing session. The bookstore has volumes for everyone on hand.

On Saturday afternoon, hear readings from Kevin J. Anderson, Andy Duncan, and James Gunn.

Saturday evening sees a special screening of the new Kevin Willmott film, Destination: Planet Negro!, followed by a Q&A with the director and cinematographer Matthew Jacobson. Afterward is another reception in the Oread Hotel.

Sunday morning is an informal "meet the authors and editors" session, followed by an informal reception off-campus sponsored by Kansas City in 2016, a bid for the 74th Worldcon.

John W. Campbell Memorial Award Finalists Announced

LAWRENCE, KS - May 10, 2013
Also available in .doc or .pdf version

The Center for the Study of Science Fiction at the University of Kansas is pleased to announce the 2013 finalists for the John W. Campbell Memorial Award for the best novel of the year:

The Hydrogen Sonata, by Iain M. Banks
Any Day Now, by Terry Bisson
Existence, by David Brin
The Rapture of the Nerds, by Cory Doctorow and Charles Stross
Empty Space, by M. John Harrison
Intrusion, by Ken MacLeod
Railsea, by China Miéville
The Fractal Prince, by Hannu Rajaniemi
Blue Remembered Earth, by Alastair Reynolds
Jack Glass: The Story of a Murderer, by Adam Roberts
2312, by Kim Stanley Robinson
Slow Apocalypse, by John Varley
Alif the Unseen, by G. Willow Wilson

The Campbell Award is one of the major annual awards for science fiction. The first Campbell Award was presented at the Illinois Institute of Technology in 1973. Since then the Award has been presented in various parts of the world: at California State University at Fullerton; at St. John's College, Oxford; at the World SF Writers Conference in Dublin; in Stockholm; at the World SF meeting in Dublin again; the University of Kansas; and in a joint event with the SFRA Convention in Kansas City in 2007.

Since 1979, the Campbell Award has been presented during the Campbell Conference at the University of Kansas in Lawrence, Kansas, as the focal point of a weekend of discussions about the writing, illustration, publishing, teaching, and criticism of science fiction.

The Award was created to honor the late editor of Astounding Science Fiction magazine, now named Analog. Campbell, who edited the magazine from 1937 until his death in 1971, is called by many writers and scholars the father of modern science fiction. Writers and critics Harry Harrison and Brian W. Aldiss established the award in Campbell's name as a way of continuing his efforts to encourage writers to produce their best possible work.

The Campbell Award differs from most other major awards in the field by being restricted to the novel and by its method of selection. The Hugo Awards are voted on by some thousand of the several thousand members who attend the World Science Fiction Convention, which meets annually at different locations on Labor Day weekend. The Nebula Awards are voted on by some hundred of the nearly three thousand members of the Science Fiction Writers of America and presented at the annual Nebula Award meeting usually held late in the Spring.

The Campbell Award is selected by a committee small enough to discuss among its members all of the nominated novels. The current jury consists of Gregory Benford, Paul Di Filippo, Sheila Finch, James Gunn, Elizabeth Anne Hull, Paul Kincaid, Christopher McKitterick, Pamela Sargent, and T.A. Shippey.

The Award will be presented Friday, June 14, at the Campbell Conference, held at the Oread Hotel in Lawrence, Kansas, June 14-16, 2014.  

Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award Finalists Announced

LAWRENCE, KS - May 10, 2013
Also available in .doc or .pdf version

The Center for the Study of Science Fiction at the University of Kansas is pleased to announce the 2013 finalists for the Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award for the best short story of the year:

"Things Greater Than Love," Kate Bachus, Strange Horizons (19 March 2012).
"Immersion," Aliette de Bodard, Clarkesworld (June 2012).
"Scattered Along the River of Heaven," Aliette de Bodard, Clarkesworld (January 2012).
"Close Encounters," Andy Duncan, The Pottawottamie Giant (PS Publishing). NOTE: Duncan, a juror, removed the story from consideration.
"The Grinnell Method," Molly Gloss, Strange Horizons (3 September & 10 September 2012).
"The Weight of History, The Lightness of the Future," Jay Lake, Subterranean Press Magazine (Spring 2012).
"The Bookmaking Habits of Select Species," Ken Liu, Lightspeed (August 2012).
"Mono No Aware," Ken Liu, The Future Is Japanese (Haikasoru).
"Nahiku West," Linda Nagata, Analog (October 2012).
Eater-of-Bone, Robert Reed, (PS Publishing).
"The Peak of Eternal Light," Bruce Sterling, Edge of Infinity (Solaris).
"(To See the Other) Whole Against the Sky," E. Catherine Tobler, Clarkesworld (November 2012).
After the Fall, Before the Fall, During the Fall, by Nancy Kress (Tachyon Press).

The Sturgeon Award was established in 1987 by James Gunn, Founding Director of the Center, and the heirs of Theodore Sturgeon, including his partner Jayne Engelhart Tannehill and Sturgeon's children, as an appropriate memorial to one of the great short-story writers in a field distinguished by its short fiction. The current jury consists of Elizabeth Bear, Andy Duncan, James Gunn, Kij Johnson, George Zebrowski, and Noël Sturgeon, Trustee of the Theodore Sturgeon Literary Estate.

Sturgeon, born in 1918, was closely identified with the Golden Age of science fiction, 1939-1950, and is often mentioned as one of the four writers who helped establish that age. The others were Isaac Asimov, Robert A. Heinlein, and A. E. van Vogt; all four had their first SF stories published in 1939. In addition to fiction (his best-known novel is the classic, More Than Human), Sturgeon also wrote book reviews, poetry, screenplays, radio plays, and television plays, including two classic teleplays for the original Star Trek. He was a popular lecturer and teacher, and was a regular visiting writer at the Intensive Institute on the Teaching of Science Fiction. Sturgeon died in 1985. His books, manuscripts, and papers are deposited at the University of Kansas.

The Sturgeon Award will be presented Friday, June 14, at the Campbell Conference, held at the Oread Hotel in Lawrence, Kansas, June 14-16, 2014.

Andy Duncan and James Gunn:
Guest Authors for 2013 Speculative Fiction Writing Workshop

LAWRENCE, KS - April 9, 2013

Science Fiction Grand Master James Gunn - who founded the Center for the Study of SF at KU and taught the workshop from 1985 to 2010 - joins this summer's Speculative Fiction Writing Workshop for Week One of the Workshop. Also, Andy Duncan has once again agreed to serve as guest author for Week Two of the Speculative Fiction Writing Workshop. Welcome back, Jim and Andy! Author and CSSF Director Christopher McKitterick, who served as guest author from 1996 to 2010, has led the Workshop since 2011.

For 2013, the Workshop meets from June 2 - 14, followed by the Campbell Awards and Conference, which runs from June 13 - 16, which in turn is followed by the two-week Intensive Science Fiction Institute. Gunn joins us for the first week of the Workshop, for lunches throughout, and for the Conference; Andy joins us for the second week plus the Conference; and our Campbell Award- and Sturgeon Award-winning authors are usually on hand for the last day or two of the Workshop to share their expertise.

The Workshop is a fantastic experience, intended especially for writers who have just begun to publish or who need that final bit of insight or skill to become a published author. We work with all brands of speculative fiction, including horror, fantasy, magical realism, slipstream, speculative philosophy, all genres of science fiction, and so on, and it's a wonderful way to bond with fellow writers in a friendly and dedicated atmosphere. Plus we go out to dinner every night at a different restaurant in downtown Lawrence, watch lots of (both admirable and awful) SF film, and write our brains out.

Starting in 2011, the Workshop is also available for KU graduate credit as ENGL 757. If you're a grad student who needs summer credit to accelerate that graduation date, perfect! Most attendees, however, simply enroll as a professional workshop rather than for credit. Attendees come to KU from all around the world, so you'll get the chance to work with new people.

Interested? This is quite the opportunity to gain insights from some of the most-respected authors in the field. We are open for applications right now through May 20, but sooner is better as we usually fill early. See the website for details.

Elizabeth Bear and Andy Duncan Join Sturgeon Award Jury

LAWRENCE, KS - April 5, 2013
Also available in .doc or .pdf version

Elizabeth Bear and Andy Duncan have accepted appointment to the jury for the Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award for the best short SF of the year. They replace Frederik Pohl, who retired from the jury after having served for many years, almost since the Award's inception (see the next News item for more about Pohl's retirement).


Elizabeth Bear
photo by Kyle Cassidy

Elizabeth Bear was born on the same day as Frodo and Bilbo Baggins, but in a different year. She is the John W. Campbell New Writer, Hugo, Locus, and Spectrum Award-winning author of more than a dozen novels and nearly a hundred short stories, including her 2008 Sturgeon Award-winning story, "Tideline." Her work has been nominated numerous times for these and other awards. Bear's hobbies include rock climbing and cooking. Bear lives in Massachusetts, but may frequently be found in Wisconsin, the home of her partner, fantasist Scott Lynch.


Andy Duncan won the Sturgeon Award for his 2001 Asimov's novella "The Chief Designer." His first collection, Beluthahatchie and Other Stories, won a World Fantasy Award, as did his SciFi.com story, "The Pottawatomie Giant." Duncan has been nominated six times for the Nebula Award, twice for the Stoker, three times for the World Fantasy Award, twice for the Shirley Jackson Award, and twice for the Hugo Award. Duncan has been a juror for the Philip K. Dick, Shirley Jackson, and Bram Stoker awards, and has taught at Clarion, Clarion West, and the SF Writing Workshop at the University of Kansas. Recent books include The Pottawatomie Giant & Other Stories, his second short-fiction collection; Crossroads: Tales of the Southern Literary Fantastic, an anthology co-edited with F. Brett Cox; The Night Cache, a stand-alone novella; and Alabama Curiosities, an offbeat travel guide. A tenure-track faculty member in the English department at Frostburg State University in Maryland, Duncan also teaches a weekly seminar on 21st-century science fiction and fantasy in the Honors College of the University of Alabama.


Andy Duncan
photo by Al Bogdan



The Sturgeon Award for the best short science fiction of the year is one of the major annual awards for science fiction. It was established in 1987 by James Gunn, Founding Director of the Center for the Study of Science Fiction at KU, and the heirs of Theodore Sturgeon, including his widow Jayne Sturgeon and Sturgeon's children, as an appropriate memorial to one of the great short-story writers in a field distinguished by its short fiction.

Sturgeon, born in 1918, was closely identified with the Golden Age of science fiction, 1939-1950, and is often mentioned as one of the four writers who helped establish that age. The others were Isaac Asimov, Robert A. Heinlein, and A. E. van Vogt; all four had their first SF stories published in 1939. In addition to fiction (his best-known novel is the classic, More than Human), Sturgeon also wrote book reviews, poetry, screenplays, radio plays, and television plays, including two classic teleplays for the original Star Trek. He was a popular lecturer and teacher, and was a regular visiting writer at the Intensive Institute on the Teaching of Science Fiction. Sturgeon died in 1985.

His books, manuscripts, and papers have been deposited at the University of Kansas, as he wished. See this page for news and information about the 2011 acquisition, valued at over $600,000.

For its first eight years (1987-1994), the Sturgeon Award was selected by a committee of short-fiction experts headed by Orson Scott Card. Beginning in 1995, the Sturgeon Award became a juried award, with winners selected by a committee composed of James Gunn, Frederik Pohl, and Judith Merril. After the 1996 Award, Judith Merril resigned and was replaced by Kij Johnson, the 1994 Sturgeon winner; in 2005, George Zebrowski joined the jury. Since 1999, one of Sturgeon's children has also participated in this process, usually Nöel Sturgeon.

The current jury consists of Elizabeth Bear, Andy Duncan, James Gunn, Kij Johnson, George Zebrowski, and Nöel Sturgeon, Trustee of the Theodore Sturgeon Literary Estate.

Eligible stories are those published in English during the previous calendar year. Nominations come from a wide variety of science-fiction reviewers and serious readers as well as from the editors who publish short fiction. Nominations are collected during the winter by Chris McKitterick, who produces a list of finalists based on nominators' rankings. The jury then reads all of the finalists and debates their merits during the spring until they arrive at a consensus decision in May. The winning author is usually contacted in May and invited to attend the Campbell Conference; the winner often attends the last day or two of the SF Writers Workshop, as well.

The Sturgeon Award is presented during the Campbell Conference Awards Banquet at the University of Kansas in Lawrence, Kansas, as the focal point of a weekend of discussions about the writing, illustration, publishing, teaching, and criticism of science fiction.

Frederik Pohl Steps Down from Sturgeon Award Jury

LAWRENCE, KS - April 4, 2013
Also available in .doc or .pdf version

Earlier this year, Frederik Pohl announced his intentions to step down from his long-time service to the Award.

New Sturgeon Award juror Andy Duncan talks about being honored with the Award by Pohl:

One of the highlights of my life was being handed my Sturgeon Award trophy by Frederik Pohl, at the 2002 ceremony, as he's been one of my heroes since I was a kid. His stories, novels, and nonfiction, and the magazines and anthologies he has edited, have not only shaped the field of science fiction for me and everyone else, but have shaped my conception of what it means to be a professional writer. On the Sturgeon jury, in particular, his firsthand knowledge of the science-fiction short story is simply irreplaceable; the jury will have a Fred-shaped hole in it forever.


Pohl presents the Sturgeon Award to Duncan.

Chris McKitterick recalls how Pohl changed his life:

I first came to the University of Kansas to take James Gunn's SF Writing Workshop in the summer of 1992, and was both astounded and incredibly pleased to discover that we had the opportunity to work with not only Gunn but another master of the art - completely to ourselves! - Frederik Pohl. I first read his work in the form of Gateway, which still holds a central place in my heart and deeply influenced how I write. That workshop truly changed my life. I felt that I must do my absolute best to become a real SF writer so I could retroactively deserve such access and professional attention. Fred returned to the Workshop and Campbell Conference just about every year for the following two decades, sharing his time, intelligence, and gentle wisdom with other summer-program attendees. Fred is one of the reasons I fell in love with the Center. No one can be Fred, but he inspires us to be our absolute best.

James Gunn shares an excerpt of his essay, "Fred and Me," from the Gateways collection:


Pohl at the 2002 Campbell Conference.

Fred told me once, "Conventions never end; they just adjourn to another venue." Thats the way it was for Fred and me. We met at a convention, the World Science Fiction Convention of 1952, held in the old Morrison Hotel in Chicago. It was my first convention, my first meeting with SF writers and editors, and even readers, of any kind, and it was a wonderful beginning.

Id been writing science fiction since the spring of 1948 and having my stories published since the fall of 1949. During those two years I kept writing, among other things a novella, "Breaking Point," that I adapted from a three-act play I wrote as an Investigation and Conference project. I sent it to Horace Gold, editor of Galaxy, and one day I got a telephone call from this clipped New York voice saying he liked "Breaking Point," but it was too long and would I let Ted Sturgeon cut it down.

Horace also suggested my name to Fred Pohl, who was running a literary agency called Dirk Wylie and, I later discovered, was close to Horace, and Fred became my agent. He was a good agent, and he sold a lot of stories for mesome to Horace (though not "Breaking Point," which he sold to Lester del Rey at the new Space Science Fiction), some to John Campbell, some to lesser markets, and one wondrous sale to Argosyand a couple of novels.

When Orson Scott Card got too busy to organize the Sturgeon Award decision process, I asked Fred if we could do it. Together we recruited Judy Merril and later, after her resignation the year before her death, we got Kij Johnson, a previous winner, as a replacement. I havent even mentioned Freds distinguished service as president of the Science Fiction Writers of America (or the irony of his having criticized its value in earlier days), or as president of World SF, or his many invitations to speak as a futurist, or his lecturing on science fiction in Europe for the US Information Agency (he paved the way for my three later trips), or his Grand Master Award from SFWA, or his awards from other groups such as the Science Fiction Research Association, or the trends his stories and novels have anticipated. You can look it up.

Weve all grown old together, Fred and me and science fiction, too. Conventions are not what they used to be (neither is the future). I wasnt there at the beginning of the conventions, as Fred was, or of the Futurians, who were banned from the first World Convention but got their revenge by taking over a good part of science fiction in their day. But weve seen a lot of itFred for more than seventy years, me for only sixty. Maybe the next convention will convene in an alternate universe.

We will truly miss Fred's contributions to the Center and the Award. 

Meagan Kane and Mackenzie VanBeest: New AboutSF Coordinators

LAWRENCE, KS - April 2, 2013

Please give a warm welcome to the Center for the Study of Science Fiction's new AboutSF Coordinators, Meagan Kane and Mackenzie VanBeest. They are currently getting up to speed, consulting with prior AboutSF Coordinators, setting up their workspace, and are in the midst of planning for future SF-education outreach. Here is the official AboutSF website:
http://www.aboutsf.com

When in Lawrence, KS, you can find Meagan and Mackenzie throughout the week in the CSSF offices and Lending Library located in 3040 Wescoe (their schedule is posted outside the room). If you prefer Facebook interaction, we have both a page and a group here. AboutSF is also on Facebook; you can find the AboutSF Facebook Group here:
https://www.facebook.com/groups/27027711727

And the Facebook Page here:
https://www.facebook.com/pages/About-SF/146611942179102

Speaking of our library, we'll host a grand re-opening later this spring, after we complete alphabetizing our massively improved holdings of books, magazines, digital media, and ephemera.

Meanwhile, welcome to Meagan and Mackenzie!

AboutSF is the Center's educational-outreach program. We help teachers, librarians, researchers, and readers learn more about speculative literature and how to use it in teaching. AboutSF is a joint project of the Center for the Study of Science Fiction at KU, the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America, and the Science Fiction Research Association, with generous support from Tor Books, The Heinlein Prize Trust, and several individual donors.

Cory Doctorow's Talk Recorded and Streamed

The KU School of Journalism streamed the talk, and it will soon be available via YouTube.

Cory Doctorow to Present 2013 Gunn Lecture

Lawrence, KS - February 4, 2013
For immediate release
(Scroll down for downloadable versions of the news release and posters)

Author, journalist, technology activist, and Boing Boing co-editor Cory Doctorow presents this year's Richard W. Gunn Memorial Lecture:

"The Coming War on General Purpose Computing:
Every single political issue will end up rehashing the stupid Internet copyright fight."

When:
Thursday, February 28, 2013
7:30pm - 9:30pm

Where:
Alderson Auditorium
University of Kansas Student Union
Lawrence, KS 66045

Cost:
Free! Seating is limited, so arrive early to ensure a spot.

Jayhawk Ink bookstore will have copies of several of Doctorow's books available to purchase in Alderson Auditorium (as well as the bookstore on Level 2) and get signed by the author after the talk.

This is Doctorow's third visit to KU: first in 1999 when his story "Craphound" (his first published story) was a finalist for the Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award, and next in 2009 when his novel Little Brother won the John W. Campbell Memorial Award.

Don't miss hearing one of contemporary science fiction's brightest minds talk about some of our most-relevant issues! Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Science Fiction and the KU Department of English.


Bio:
Cory Doctorow is a science fiction author, activist, journalist, and technology activist. He is the co-editor of the popular weblog Boing Boing, and a contributor to The Guardian, the New York Times, Publishers Weekly, Wired, and many other newspapers, magazines, and websites. He was formerly Director of European Affairs for the Electronic Frontier Foundation, a non-profit civil-liberties group that defends freedom in technology law, policy, standards, and treaties. He holds an honorary doctorate in computer science from the Open University (UK), where he is a Visiting Senior Lecturer; in 2007, he served as the Fulbright Chair at the Annenberg Center for Public Diplomacy at the University of Southern California.

Doctorow's novels have been translated into dozens of languages and are published by Tor Books and simultaneously released on the Internet under Creative Commons licenses that encourage their re-use and sharing, a move that increases his sales by enlisting his readers to help promote his work. His work has won the Locus, Sunburst, Ontario Library White Pine, Prometheus, Indienet, and John W. Campbell Memorial awards, and been nominated for the Hugo, Nebula, Theodore Sturgeon Memorial (for "Craphound"), and British Science Fiction Awards. His latest young-adult novel is Pirate Cinema, a story of mashup guerillas who declare war on the entertainment industry. His latest novel for adults is Rapture of the Nerds, written with Charles Stross and published in 2012. His New York Times Bestseller Little Brother was published in 2008. A sequel, Homeland, was just published. His latest short story collection is With a Little Help, available in paperback, ebook, audiobook and limited edition hardcover. In 2011, Tachyon Books published a collection of his essays, called Context: Further Selected Essays on Productivity, Creativity, Parenting, and Politics in the 21st Century (with an introduction by Tim O'Reilly) and IDW published a collection of graphic stories inspired by his short fiction called Cory Doctorow's Futuristic Tales of the Here and Now. The Great Big Beautiful Tomorrow, a PM Press Outspoken Authors chapbook, was also published in 2011.

He co-founded the open-source peer-to-peer software company OpenCola, sold to OpenText, Inc in 2003, and presently serves on the boards and advisory boards of the Participatory Culture Foundation, the Clarion Foundation, The Glenn Gould Foundation, and the Chabot Space & Science Center's SpaceTime project.

In 2007, Entertainment Weekly called him, "The William Gibson of his generation." He was also named one of Forbes Magazine's 2007/8/9/10 Web Celebrities, and one of the World Economic Forum's Young Global Leaders for 2007.

Born in Toronto, Canada, he now lives in London.


The Lecture Series:
The Gunn Lecture, endowed by Dr. Richard W. Gunn, James Gunn's brother, has featured several science-fiction scholars. Although it has also sponsored speakers on Shakespeare and Ralph Ellison, it often brings distinguished science-fiction scholars to the campus beginning with scholar Fredric Jameson, William A. Lane Professor at Duke University; and continuing with Bill Brown, Edgar Carson Waller Professor at the University of Chicago; China Miéville, British author of what has become known as the New Weird; and Nöel Sturgeon, Theodore Sturgeon's daughter, Trustee of his literary estate (which recently made a major donation of his papers to KU), Dean of Environmental Studies at York University in Toronto, and juror on the Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award. The Center also recently co-sponsored a visit from Michael Chabon, prize-winning author and editor.

Promotional materials:
KU Calendar news item here.
SFWA news item here.
Facebook event page here.
Google+ event page here.
Yelp event page here.

.doc version of full news release here.

Posters:
Poster 1 uses the cover of Doctorow's novel, For the Win:

Poster 2 uses the cover of Doctorow's novel, Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom:

Feel free to use these images and posters on your websites, share them around, remix them to help promote the talk, and so forth!

If you are unfamiliar with Doctorow's work and would like to get acquainted with it, here's a short reader (from the CSSF "Science, Technology, & Society" course) - all available free online:

Short story, "I, Robot."
Short-short story, "Printcrime."
Chapter 4 from the Campbell Award-winning novel, Little Brother.
    Want to read more Doctorow stories? Novels? See the recommended reading, below.
Essay, "I Can't Let You Do That, Dave: What it means to design our computers and devices to disobey us."
Essay, "Disorganised but effective: The most profound social revolutions in human history have arisen whenever a technology comes along that lowers transaction costs for everyone."
Essay, "Internet copyright law has to have public support if it's going to work."
Essay, "A Vocabulary for Speaking about the Future."

Want to read more Doctorow articles and essays? Here's some more recommended reading to become familiar with his work:

Call for Applications for AboutSF Coordinator, Webmaster

Lawrence, KS - January 22, 2013

We have just announced a call for applications for both the AboutSF Coordinator position and the AboutSF Webmaster position. See this page for full details.

We will accept applications until February 4, 2013, unless filled sooner - or later if we don't get appropriate applicants.

Kij Johnson Delivers Inaugural Pembroke Lecture

Oxford, England - January 18, 2013

CSSF Associate Director and KU Fiction-Writing Professor Kij Johnson gave the inaugural Pembroke Lecture on Fantasy Literature at Oxford. The official website contains lots of photos, information, and a podcast of the talk. Here's the original press release.

Pembroke College invited award-winning author Kij Johnson to deliver the inaugural Pembroke Lecture on Fantasy Literature in Honor of JRR Tolkien. This is the first annual lecture in the series designed to explore the history and current state of fantasy literature. Johnson also offered a fiction masterclass at Pembroke on January 19th.

The series is intended to memorialize Tolkien, who was Rawlinson and Bosworth Professor of Anglo-Saxon at Pembroke for twenty years; he wrote The Hobbit and much of The Lord of the Rings during his time at the college. The lectures are sponsored through a grant from the Pembroke Annual Fund.

In the photo below, organizers of the lecture found a photograph of Tolkien standing outside Pembroke, and then combined it with a photo of Johnson standing near the same spot. "These photographs demonstrate how we are all, literally, walking in the footsteps of people from the past!"

To see the CSSF news archive from 2011-2012, click here.
To see news from 2009-2010, click here.
To see previous news, click here.


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